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Sunday, November 28, 2010

Hot Tub Hens with Smokey Rice

More deer camp food...

I brined the cornish game hens for a few hours in a mixture of water, kosher salt, turbinado sugar, onions, and garlic....


fired up my drum....


rubbed the birds with butter, placed more butter under the skin, then seasoned.

I smoked the hens in my drum at about 300F...using hickory









while the hens were smoking I made some rice. This time I used some Uncle Ben's wild rice blend. ( I've never tried it before).

I sauted onions and garlic in butter, added the rice, water and seasoning package... then smoked on the Memphis Pro at 190 for about 20 minutes. Then raised the temp to 350F and let it cook uncovered until all of the liquid was absorbed. I didn't time the cook.












also smoked some dinner rolls...






It was soooo tasty. :) Loved the smoked rice...



Another successful deer camp meal.

It was actually an easy meal to make... I might have to make this again next year. :)

14 comments:

Anonymous said...

everytime i do cornish hens I use uncle bens wild rice...I cook the rice till it soaks up the water then I stuff the hens with the wild rice and put them on the smoker..really give the birds a good taste..

Marc van der Wouw said...

Great work...nice hen's

Big Dude said...

From the title, I thought you had expanded on the dishwasher salmon, my son cooked for us, and invented a way to cook the hens in the hot tub while you lounged around in it and sipped wine, after a hard day of chasing deer.

cowgirl said...

That sounds tasty Anonymous!

cowgirl said...

Thank you Marc! Your lamb looks wonderful. :)

cowgirl said...

Hey Larry, how did you like the dishwasher fish? I love the stuff. lol
No hot tub here... I'd never get my work done.
Thanks Larry!

mplaneta said...

Good Morning,

I have been following your blog for awhile now and love what you do. I am new to smoking and trying things out. I am still trying to figure out how much smoke to use and stuff. In a typical smoke what percentage of the time would you say you have wood smoking in your smoker and what percentage is just heat wit no wood smoking.

A Year on the Grill said...

just too funny

love the entire post, sounds delicious!

Big Dude said...

We like poached fish and salmon in parchment, so the dishwater salmon was a hit with us.

Bushman said...

The picture is awesome. They have their "arms" propped up on the edge of the tub and everything. If you don't mind I would like to save that picture and possibly use it in the future as funny refrence for something not sure what but the picture is too great not to hang on to. PS the food looks great as well!!:)

cowgirl said...

mplaneta, Thank you for the kind words about my blog. I apprecate it!
Smoke varies.. Some people like a smokier end product than others. For me... I like a light smoke with poultry and fish and a heavier smoke flavor with beef and pork.
For best results the smoke needs to be a thin blue smoke, not a billowing white one.
I smoke chicken for the first hour (usually) and then let the heat cook it the remaining time.
On larger cuts of meat... brisket, pork shoulders etc.. the meat seems to only take on smoke for the first 4 hours. After that no smoking wood is needed (in my opinion).
Some woods are a lot stronger than others. Mesquite is one of them. It just takes a small bit of mesuite to do the job....too much can be bitter.
Fruit and nut woods are mild.
The best way to do it is start with a small amount of smoking wood, then add more on your next cook if you want the flavor to be stronger.
Not sure if I answered your question mplaneta, please feel free to let me know if I didn't!
Hope you have great luck with your cooking. :)
Thanks again..

cowgirl said...

Thank you Dave!

cowgirl said...

Larry, I need to try parchment.. bet it makes the fish nice and moist too. Thanks!

cowgirl said...

Thanks Bushman! Feel free to use the pic. :)